Nov
11

2 Dates, 1 Speech




Posted at 22:54 by Sadly, No!

Why are we not surprised?





Speech at the National Endowment for Democracy, Oct. 6, 2005 Veterans’ Day Speech, November 11, 2005
Some call this evil Islamic radicalism; others, militant Jihadism; still others, Islamo-fascism. Whatever it’s called, this ideology is very different from the religion of Islam. This form of radicalism exploits Islam to serve a violent, political vision: the establishment, by terrorism and subversion and insurgency, of a totalitarian empire that denies all political and religious freedom. These extremists distort the idea of jihad into a call for terrorist murder against Christians and Jews and Hindus — and also against Muslims from other traditions, who they regard as heretics.

Some call this evil Islamic radicalism; others, militant Jihadism; and still others, Islamo-fascism. Whatever it’s called, this ideology is very different from the religion of Islam. This form of radicalism exploits Islam to serve a violent, political vision: the establishment, by terrorism, subversion and insurgency, of a totalitarian empire that denies all political and religious freedom. These extremists distort the idea of jihad into a call for terrorist murder against Christians and Hindus and Jews — and against Muslims, themselves, who do not share their radical vision.
Many militants are part of global, borderless terrorist organizations like al Qaeda, which spreads propaganda, and provides financing and technical assistance to local extremists, and conducts dramatic and brutal operations like September the 11th. Other militants are found in regional groups, often associated with al Qaeda — paramilitary insurgencies and separatist movements in places like Somalia, and the Philippines, and Pakistan, and Chechnya, and Kashmir, and Algeria. Still others spring up in local cells, inspired by Islamic radicalism, but not centrally directed. Islamic radicalism is more like a loose network with many branches than an army under a single command. Yet these operatives, fighting on scattered battlefields, share a similar ideology and vision for our world.
Many militants are part of a global, borderless terrorist organization like al Qaeda — which spreads propaganda, and provides financing and technical assistance to local extremists, and conducts dramatic and brutal operations like the attacks of September the 11th. Other militants are found in regional groups, often associated with al Qaeda — paramilitary insurgencies and separatist movements in places like Somalia, the Philippines, Pakistan, Chechnya, Kashmir and Algeria. Still others spring up in local cells — inspired by Islamic radicalism, but not centrally directed. Islamic radicalism is more like a loose network with many branches than an army under a single command. Yet these operatives, fighting on scattered battlefields, share a similar ideology and vision for the world.
We know the vision of the radicals because they’ve openly stated it — in videos, and audiotapes, and letters, and declarations, and websites.
We know the vision of the radicals because they have openly stated it — in videos and audiotapes and letters and declarations and on websites.
First, these extremists want to end American and Western influence in the broader Middle East, because we stand for democracy and peace, and stand in the way of their ambitions. Al Qaeda’s leader, Osama bin Laden, has called on Muslims to dedicate, quote, their “resources, sons and money to driving the infidels out of their lands.” Their tactic to meet this goal has been consistent for a quarter-century: They hit us, and expect us to run.
First, these extremists want to end American and Western influence in the broader Middle East, because we stand for democracy and peace, and stand in the way of their ambitions. Al Qaeda’s leader, Osama bin Laden, has called on Muslims to dedicate, their “resources, their sons and money to driving the infidels out of our lands.” The tactics of al Qaeda and other Islamic extremists have been consistent for a quarter of a century: They hit us, and expect us to run.
Second, the militant network wants to use the vacuum created by an American retreat to gain control of a country, a base from which to launch attacks and conduct their war against non-radical Muslim governments. Over the past few decades, radicals have specifically targeted Egypt, and Saudi Arabia, and Pakistan, and Jordan for potential takeover. They achieved their goal, for a time, in Afghanistan. Now they’ve set their sights on Iraq. Bin Laden has stated: “The whole world is watching this war and the two adversaries. It’s either victory and glory, or misery and humiliation.” The terrorists regard Iraq as the central front in their war against humanity. And we must recognize Iraq as the central front in our war on terror.
Second, the militant network wants to use the vacuum created by an American retreat to gain control of a country — a base from which to launch attacks and conduct their war against non-radical Muslim governments. Over the past few decades, radicals have specifically targeted Egypt and Saudi Arabia and Pakistan and Jordan for potential takeover. They achieved their goal, for a time, in Afghanistan. And now they’ve set their sights on Iraq. In his recent letter, Zawahiri writes that al Qaeda views Iraq as, “the place for the greatest battle.” The terrorists regard Iraq as the central front in their war against humanity. We must recognize Iraq as the central front in our war against the terrorists. (Applause.)
They want us to repeat the sad history of Beirut in 1983, and Mogadishu in 1993 — only this time on a larger scale, with greater consequences.
They believe that America can be made to run again — only this time on a larger scale, with greater consequences.
Third, the militants believe that controlling one country will rally the Muslim masses, enabling them to overthrow all moderate governments in the region, and establish a radical Islamic empire that spans from Spain to Indonesia.
Third, these militants believe that controlling one country will rally the Muslim masses, enabling them to overthrow all moderate governments in the region, and establish a radical Islamic empire that spans from Spain to Indonesia.
With greater economic and military and political power, the terrorists would be able to advance their stated agenda: to develop weapons of mass destruction, to destroy Israel, to intimidate Europe, to assault the American people, and to blackmail our government into isolation.
With the greater economic, military and political power they seek, the terrorists would be able to advance their stated agenda: to develop weapons of mass destruction; to destroy Israel; to intimidate Europe; to assault the American people; and to blackmail our government into isolation.
Some might be tempted to dismiss these goals as fanatical or extreme. Well, they are fanatical and extreme — and they should not be dismissed. Our enemy is utterly committed. As Zarqawi has vowed, “We will either achieve victory over the human race or we will pass to the eternal life.” And the civilized world knows very well that other fanatics in history, from Hitler to Stalin to Pol Pot, consumed whole nations in war and genocide before leaving the stage of history. Evil men, obsessed with ambition and unburdened by conscience, must be taken very seriously — and we must stop them before their crimes can multiply.
Some might be tempted to dismiss these goals as fanatical or extreme. They are fanatical and extreme — but they should not be dismissed. Our enemy is utterly committed. As Zarqawi has vowed, “We will either achieve victory over the human race or we will pass to the eternal life.” (Applause.) And the civilized world knows very well that other fanatics in history, from Hitler to Stalin to Pol Pot, consumed whole nations in war and genocide before leaving the stage of history. Evil men, obsessed with ambition and unburdened by conscience, must be taken very seriously — and we must stop them before their crimes can multiply.
Defeating the militant network is difficult, because it thrives, like a parasite, on the suffering and frustration of others. The radicals exploit local conflicts to build a culture of victimization, in which someone else is always to blame and violence is always the solution. They exploit resentful and disillusioned young men and women, recruiting them through radical mosques as the pawns of terror. And they exploit modern technology to multiply their destructive power. Instead of attending faraway training camps, recruits can now access online training libraries to learn how to build a roadside bomb, or fire a rocket-propelled grenade — and this further spreads the threat of violence, even within peaceful democratic societies.
Defeating the militant network is difficult, because it thrives, like a parasite, on the suffering and frustration of others. The radicals exploit local conflicts to build a culture of victimization, in which someone else is always to blame and violence is always the solution. They exploit resentful and disillusioned young men and women, recruiting them through radical mosques as pawns of terror. And they exploit modern technology to multiply their destructive power. Instead of attending far-away training camps, recruits can now access online training libraries to learn how to build a roadside bomb or fire a rocket-propelled grenade — and this further spreads the threat of violence, even within peaceful democratic societies.
The influence of Islamic radicalism is also magnified by helpers and enablers. They have been sheltered by authoritarian regimes, allies of convenience like Syria and Iran, that share the goal of hurting America and moderate Muslim governments, and use terrorist propaganda to blame their own failures on the West and America, and on the Jews.
The influence of Islamic radicalism is also magnified by helpers and enablers. They’ve been sheltered by authoritarian regimes — allies of convenience like Iran and Syria — that share the goal of hurting America and modern Muslim governments, and use terrorist propaganda to blame their own failures on the West, on America, and on the Jews.
Together, we’ve killed or captured nearly all of those directly responsible for the September the 11th attacks; as well as some of bin Laden’s most senior deputies; al Qaeda managers and operatives in more than 24 countries; the mastermind of the USS Cole bombing, who was chief of al Qaeda operations in the Persian Gulf; the mastermind of the Jakarta and the first Bali bombings; a senior Zarqawi terrorist planner, who was planning attacks in Turkey; and many of al Qaeda’s senior leaders in Saudi Arabia.
Together with our partners, we’ve disrupted a number of serious al Qaeda terrorist plots since September the 11th — including several plots to attack inside the United States. Our coalition against terror has killed or captured nearly all those directly responsible for the September the 11th attacks. We’ve captured or killed several of bin Laden’s most serious deputies, al Qaeda managers and operatives in more than 24 countries; the mastermind of the USS Cole bombing, who was chief of al Qaeda’s operations in the Persian Gulf; the mastermind of the bombings in Jakarta and Bali; a senior Zarqawi terrorist planner, who was planning attacks in Turkey; and many of their senior leaders in Saudi Arabia.

And oh by the way — it goes on like that for a long, long time.

75 Comments »

  1. almostinfamous said,

    November 11, 2005 at 23:38

    if only they put as much effort into promoting proper recycling as they do into talking-point recycling, we would have cars made from silly string and water made from old shoes

  2. Karla Marx said,

    November 12, 2005 at 0:16

    Damn!

  3. Steve M. said,

    November 12, 2005 at 0:17

    Yeah, but this time it’ll make all those goddamn liberals see reason!

  4. Joseph Goebbels said,

    November 12, 2005 at 0:25

    Gooood, goooooood, you learn well, Herr Bush.

  5. c. said,

    November 12, 2005 at 0:25

    hey, that’s really cool!

  6. c. said,

    November 12, 2005 at 0:26

    I mean, the side-by-side comparison is cool. Bush is not cool

  7. Josh said,

    November 12, 2005 at 0:30

    Harriet Miers thinks he’s cool.

    So now we’ve got a rally-the-country-’round-the-president terrorism stump speech? They’re incompetent AND lazy.

  8. teh l4m3 said,

    November 12, 2005 at 0:34

    Way to make an effort, junior!

  9. Flamethrower said,

    November 12, 2005 at 0:37

    hey boosh, quit trying to win the argument.

    howzabout trying to win the war?

  10. Dr Strangelove said,

    November 12, 2005 at 0:39

    Excellent mein F?hrer…I mean Mr President.

  11. cythera4 said,

    November 12, 2005 at 0:47

    The demon Bush is plummeting, screeching into hell

  12. Reason Gone Mad said,

    November 12, 2005 at 0:47

    Hey, you’re either with the speechwriters, or you’re with the TERRORISTS, man!

  13. Generic said,

    November 12, 2005 at 0:55

    Aaarrrggghhh, this must not be DISCUSSED!!!

  14. nelle said,

    November 12, 2005 at 1:00

    Writin’ new speeches — it’s hard work!!

  15. jhe said,

    November 12, 2005 at 1:02

    And here I thought you couldn’t step in the same river twice.

  16. blondie said,

    November 12, 2005 at 1:14

    IF THIS IS THE CASE, then why did the talking heads dutifully repeat the “new offensive” line over and over and over? seems to me, to be a new ‘campaign style’ attack there would be at least some new material. On the other hand, I can only imagine how hard something like that would be to master for him.

  17. The Peking Duck said,

    November 12, 2005 at 1:48

    Cutting and pasting we lay waste our powers

    This is really humorous. But not surprising for a presidency whose only weapon is talking points. (About the title: those of you who like Wordsworth will know what I mean.)…

  18. ToddRundgrenisGod said,

    November 12, 2005 at 2:14

    Yeah, Bush’s speeches actually have been pretty consistant. Since before the invasion actually.

    Bush lied?

  19. Scott said,

    November 12, 2005 at 2:25

    George Bush calls me a jihadi
    Osama calls me a gangster of love

  20. JoeWalshisStoned said,

    November 12, 2005 at 2:34

    I wonder if the passion behind the rhetoric here is existential. If this war is justified, it raises doubts about whether the world will ever become war-free. For that reason, it raises fundamental questions about the possibility of true progress in any grand sense. If this war is justified, it might mean that patriotism will always remain a virtue in some circumstances, because the world will always, in some ways, be divided between us and others. It might be, in short, an attack upon the implicit universalism of so much modern ideology. Giving that up might be too high a price to pay. Hence it’s easier to dismiss the war as fundamentally corrupt from the start.

  21. Frederick said,

    November 12, 2005 at 2:35

    It was Veterans Day, so he gave a veteran speech.

  22. The Heretik said,

    November 12, 2005 at 2:40

    Nice catch. More on this at Strategy for Victory?

  23. Aaron said,

    November 12, 2005 at 2:42

    Workin hard…

  24. Jillian said,

    November 12, 2005 at 2:47

    “War on Terror” is just the first stage. The other emotions are not far behind. And with the smart mouths I’m seeing around here, it’s obvious that “War on Schadenfreude” is next.

  25. pgw said,

    November 12, 2005 at 2:53

    so bush mentioned that zawahiri letter in this speech; last time i checked, this letter wasn’t verified as the real deal. is bush STILL citing shady and/or forged intel?

  26. The tECHIDNA said,

    November 12, 2005 at 3:24

    OK, Bush is officially President See ‘n Say.

    “Turn the arrow, pull his string, and hear him speak!”

    And remember kiddies, pay attention to your Uncle Joe when he says
    “If you tell a lie big enough and keep repeating it, people will eventually come to believe it.”

  27. Dr. Tom More said,

    November 12, 2005 at 3:28

    This is the fifth time he’s given the same speech. See http://moquol.squarespace.com/journal/2005/10/25/the-gwot-stump-speech.html

    and

    http://moquol.squarespace.com/journal/2005/10/28/president-calm-in-the-midst-of-storm-delivers-major-address-on-gwot.html

  28. Uncle Karl said,

    November 12, 2005 at 3:30

    Crap 4 years of practicing the same damn speech and he STILL can’t get it right. I should have gotten his brother elected, at least he can remember a friggin’ speech…

  29. KEVron said,

    November 12, 2005 at 3:30

    where’s gil scott-heron when you need him?

    “we don’t need no rerun,
    we don’t need no rerun, ya know”

    KEvron

  30. don q said,

    November 12, 2005 at 3:43

    Great comparison, thanks. As Yogi Berra said, “it’s deja vu all over again”, except this stuff isn’t funny.

  31. neros_fiddle said,

    November 12, 2005 at 3:49

    Apologies for the blogwhoring, but it’s clear that what we’re seeing here aren’t mere presidential addresses, but a new kind of performance art.

  32. Matt said,

    November 12, 2005 at 3:57

    WHAT? WHAT? WHAT?

  33. elendil said,

    November 12, 2005 at 4:21

    That’s hilarious. You don’t have a President, you have one of those doll-thingies with the string at the back. When Karl Rove pulls the string, Bush’s lower jaw snaps open and shut in an unsynchronised way while a tinny speaker in his chest says “God Bless America! God Bless America!”

  34. DumpDoolittle said,

    November 12, 2005 at 4:33

    Keep digging Bush! You’ll be in hell shortly!

  35. TimW said,

    November 12, 2005 at 4:43

    The monkeys at the typewriters are getting lazy…

  36. Bloviatrix said,

    November 12, 2005 at 5:08

    He’s as stubborn in jawing as he is at warring– and just as miserably inadequate in both!

  37. tigrismus said,

    November 12, 2005 at 5:11

    How many speechwriters do they have on staff? And how much are they paid? Cuz I’m thinking both numbers are way too high for the quality and quantity of the output.

  38. Peggy Noonan said,

    November 12, 2005 at 5:40

    Elian’s magical dolphins despise repetition. Bad George, bad!

  39. Bush Wax said,

    November 12, 2005 at 5:55

    I hear the drums of war being beaten by a President that is completely out of touch with reality. He is a slippery saleman testing the waters for another conquest. One has to wonder if Bush really isn’t another Hitler trying to cure the world’s problems with unjust wars. He been able to do it with far fewer troops which are much more armored both technically and by weaponary. His declining popularity may be the only thing putting the brakes on future conquests.

  40. The Reality-Based Community said,

    November 12, 2005 at 6:33

    Thrift! Thrift, Horatio!

    Signs of environmental consciousness at 1600 Penn.:

    GWB seems to be recycling his speech texts.

  41. GOPussys said,

    November 12, 2005 at 6:49

    Bush is very much like a broken record playing over and over again. After awhile no one pays any attention to it. Will someone please unplug him??

  42. Pinko Punko said,

    November 12, 2005 at 7:15

    Hey guys, gals, sherms and germs, I’m NOT blog-whoring. I am merely accusing one of you geniuses of engineering a quite funny little prank on Jonah Goldberg, and I’d like someone to fess up. It reeks of Gavin, or one of the resident commenting studlies over here.

    It is here.

  43. Leader Of The Noble Cause said,

    November 12, 2005 at 7:42

    Nov. 6, 2006 speech for Skidrow Alley cardboard shed: Dad couldnt run again, and I’d run over the galvanized trash cans that one night I was drunk and brought Marvin home late. He got mad and started raslin’, and a yellin’ that I hadnt cottoned to my re-hab. So he made me swear I’d one day be a dentist while he had me in a full nelson and reminded me he’d had training as a para”shootist” (whatever that meant). I never did go to dentist school, but I did try some ventures and thought it was okay when I got the chance to fail at president. After all I owed him one. Didnt I? (finally! my very own words)

  44. Galveston Isle, Near Tejas said,

    November 12, 2005 at 9:55

    “Wit der propeganda ve must repeat, repeat, repeat!”

    Herr Karl (packing his bag)

  45. Marq said,

    November 12, 2005 at 10:57

    Speaking of “dear” Jonah Goldberg, I’ve just learned something that really pisses me off. The L.A. Times just fired Robert Scheer, an actual talented writer, and has seemingly hired Jonah for a column. I don’t know if one has to do with the other, but what are they, stoopid? The country is edging back toward toe center, not the fucking right. What a bunch of fuckwits. You can write these bozos at letters@latimes.com.

  46. Marq said,

    November 12, 2005 at 10:59

    Um, “back toward the center[...]“.

  47. John West said,

    November 12, 2005 at 12:47

    “There you go again…”

  48. Sue said,

    November 12, 2005 at 13:35

    Nero – that post on your blog is hysterical.

  49. Thingumbobesq said,

    November 12, 2005 at 13:36

    Perhaps this point has been blogged in the etherworld already, but… Bush like some serio-comic adulteration of Greek tragedy flails away at the ingrates that have abandoned him. Not his republican cohort but the media and dems. Oh yes– why was the media marching in lockstep with its Goebbels like idolatry before the war with blaring banners ablaze for all and sundry to behold and marvel at? And all the lemmings dutifully leapt. Were we all in the throes of some irrational will? Rather like the Hitler youth, suicide bombers, or perhaps the JDL? Hate and loathing, fear and immobility to act rationally. Lack a day. Who pulls the strings? Where are the Iagos hiding in this miasma? Oh, I remember now. Wolfowitz, Abrams. (With prompting from a Kissingerian/Haushofer geopolitical script from stage left.) Oh ye blogheads! Why are you so fickle? You can only be truly conscious of your puppet masters if you stop worrying about which end is up– the little or the big.

  50. Tim Maddog said,

    November 12, 2005 at 15:21

    Gotta catapult that propaganda, Mao-style…

  51. W Action said,

    November 12, 2005 at 16:33

    I was struck by the pull-out quote bold-faced in my local rag today, and wonder why Dems haven’t yet jumped on it. It sounds like total surrender of several key points to us critics:

    Bushbot said it was “legitimate” to criticize the decision-making and conduct of the war, just not the lies that got us into it. Really? Rove and Co. now concede that criticism of their reasoning that got us into this, and their conduct of all things Iraq” is now OK? It sounds like they think they’re now down to holding the one bridge left standing, as in, “Go ahead and look at anything else, just leave the fraudulent intelligence out of it.” Why hasn’t Reid, Dean and Co. said, “Okie-dokie, we’ll criticize those things now that you’ve said we can. And by the way, how’s that intelligence thing working out for you?”

  52. SAP said,

    November 12, 2005 at 19:03

    I guess that, after wasting so many brain cells on booze and blow, W’s speechwriters have to keep things simple for him.

  53. Mme flutterbye said,

    November 12, 2005 at 19:45

    Bad Puppet, Bad! Bad!

    No,change that to “Boring Puppet! …not good…tiresome!

    Patience, Everyone.

  54. howardBhaas said,

    November 12, 2005 at 20:37

    Bush’s speech yesterday? Word for word recyled from another speech.

    Thank God for the internet.

    Pathetic

  55. Timmah420 said,

    November 12, 2005 at 20:38

    Good comparison, but this is old news anyway, Bush has been beating this rotting horse for months.

  56. MadMustard said,

    November 12, 2005 at 20:55

    Dubya has adopted the ‘gatling gun’ approach to catapulting the propaganda.

  57. Reg said,

    November 12, 2005 at 21:37

    Time for Dumb and Dumber to be hauled in front of the nation to answer for their crimes:

    The Outrageous Silence of Dumb and Dumber:
    CLICK HERE

  58. X-Tra Rant said,

    November 12, 2005 at 23:09

    Good Little Monkey

    Well, at least we know that W can be trained to repeat the same speech over and over again. Literally. Almost the exact same speech. Good little monkey!

  59. hobojo said,

    November 13, 2005 at 0:30

    WHAT DID YOU EXPECT FROM THE CHIMP,HE STILL PULLS LICE OUT OF THE HAIRS ON CHENEY’S ASS AND EATS THEM!

  60. kickstarts said,

    November 13, 2005 at 1:56

    The problem with this country isn’t Bush, it’s the fucking assholes who elected him and the ones who keep silent. Americans hear what they want to hear. 51% of this country doesn’t give a fuck so why should anyone else. Fuck Bush and the 51% who voted for him.

  61. mark said,

    November 13, 2005 at 16:28

    Now, we can’t really blame the President on this. He doesn’t write this stuff. He only reads what his staff stuffs into his pocket and aims him toward the door of the chopper to take him to his plane.

  62. Rex Kramer, Danger Seeker said,

    November 13, 2005 at 21:57

    Am I the only one who finds it unintentionally hilarious that a man whole stole at least one election spoke to the “National Endowment for Democracy,” and that the same empty suit, an AWOL Texas National Guardsman who vacated his obligation to keep Houston safe from the Viet Cong horde, spoke at a Veteran’s Day memorial?

    What next, a speaking gig at Mensa?

  63. Mary Stackpool said,

    November 13, 2005 at 22:39

    Does Peking Duck mean T.S. Eliot instead of Wordsworth? Prufrock said “getting and spending, we lay waste our powers.”

    Just wondering……….

  64. themadness said,

    November 14, 2005 at 1:48

    how very interesting indeed

    Let us compare some of GWB’s recent speeches.
    Not exactly the sharpest tool in the shed, if I do say so myself…

  65. Pete said,

    November 14, 2005 at 2:20

    Yes this is not atypical and is quite standard practice to recylcle speeches. All presidents in modern times have done this.

  66. bartkid said,

    November 14, 2005 at 16:00

    Sounds like somebody’s re-catapulting the propaganda.

  67. minxlj said,

    November 14, 2005 at 17:58

    Well, since most people stop listening to what he has to say after the first couple of sentences, they might as well recycle the speeches

  68. Keld Bach's Press Cuttings said,

    November 14, 2005 at 19:55

    Party Time?

    Bush can’t hide it any longer . . . Here’s a snip from the comments:

    “The bum was totally drunk in both clips. Look how he swings his arm about the wife.
    God help us all.”

    Maybe that’s why he is giving the same spe…

  69. back2frog said,

    November 15, 2005 at 2:09

    those droids from the dabbya-series are getting more realistic every day. they even change small parts of their speeches now and then. cool.

  70. smapdi said,

    November 15, 2005 at 6:35

    >Evil men, obsessed with ambition and unburdened by conscience, must be taken very seriously — and we must stop them before their crimes can multiply.

    Is he calling for his own resignation?

  71. Fred Beck said,

    November 15, 2005 at 21:02

    Until reading this ranting about Moslems, I had always thought is was just Christians doing all the horrors in Northern Ireland. Boy, those Moslems are everywhere: WWII, the Holocaust, Vietnam. I never knew.

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  73. ????? said,

    December 31, 2010 at 23:16

    i like Yes this is not atypical and is quite standard practice to recylcle speeches. All presidents in modern times have done this.

  74. ipad case said,

    April 23, 2011 at 17:10

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  75. Corfu Apartments said,

    March 25, 2012 at 20:16

    Audio began playing as soon as I opened this blog, so frustrating!
    I think one of your advertisings triggered my internet browser to resize, you may well want to put that on your blacklist.

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